Emma Tyler
July 22, 2015 12:48 pm

At this point, we’ve all heard that we should cut back on those sugary sodas. Dentists warn us that they’re bad for our teeth, and doctors tell us that soda and other sweetened beverages can lead to weight gain. Many people also said that this increase in body fat can lead to insulin resistance and increase a person’s risk of developing diabetes. However, health researchers have recently discovered another reason you should put down the pop can. According to a new study, people who frequently drink sugary sodas are at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, regardless of weight gain or obesity.

This is a pretty big deal. Previously, many thought that age, obesity, and physical inactivity were the main type 2 diabetes risk factors. But this new study shows that you could be putting your self risk every time you sip a sugary soda, no matter what you weigh. The researchers who ran the study, eliminated weight as a factor and found that a daily serving of a sugary drink increased a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes by almost 13 percent over 10 ten years. That will make you think twice before opening the fridge!

Scientists say that a soda drinker’s risk increases because those little cans are crammed with sugar (one can of Coke contains 39 grams, which is almost 10 teaspoons!). Pouring all this sugar into your body at once doesn’t just make you hyper, it causes a blood sugar spike. And blood sugar spikes are not a good thing — the study shows that they can lead to insulin resistance, even if a person is at a perfectly healthy weight.

However, this study was not a clinical trial so they direct has not yet been officially proven. Even so, the beverage and soda companies are now working hard to create clearer package labeling and drinks with fewer calories. It’s great that sodas are working to become more heath conscious, but it may take some time. We don’t know about you, but a glass of good ol’ H20 has never sounded so delicious.

(Images via here).

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