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The dog walker is in critical condition and Gaga is looking for information.

Greg Hanlon
Feb 25, 2021 @ 1:29 pm
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lady gaga dog walker
Credit: Steve Granitz, Getty Images

This story originally appeared on People.com.

Lady Gaga's dog walker was shot and hospitalized in critical condition and two of her French bulldogs were stolen during a Wednesday night robbery, People confirms. A Los Angeles Police Department spokesperson told People a robbery occurred at 9:40 p.m. Wednesday night on Sierra Bonita Avenue in Hollywood, during which two French bulldogs were stolen.

The male victim was transported to the hospital and is currently in critical condition, an LAPD spokesman says. The shooter, described as a male who used a semi-automatic handgun, was seen leaving in a vehicle going northbound toward Hollywood Boulevard. The LAPD's robbery/homicide division has taken over the case.

A rep for Lady Gaga, who is currently in Italy, confirms the victim was the singer's dog walker and the two dogs were her French bulldogs, Koji and Gustav. The rep confirms Gaga is offering a $500,000 reward for information about the dogs. Those with information on the case should email KojiandGustav@gmail.com, the rep says.

In 2016, Gaga announced she'd adopted a new puppy who she would later name Gustav.

"I'm proud to announce we added a new member to the #JOANNE family," the singer shared on Instagram.

"I haven't named him yet but I call him both cowpig and moopig in the meantime!" Gaga continued in her post.

Tara Bruno, founder of SNORT Rescue, an organization that rescues bulldogs, pugs and Boston terriers, says French bulldogs are among the most stolen dog breeds because they're very popular, are small and portable, and are expensive. French bulldogs from reputable breeders cost between $3,000 and $5,000, she says.

The AKC lists French bulldogs as the fourth most popular breed in the United States, behind Labradors, golden retrievers and German shepherds. But French bulldogs are easier to steal because they are small, says Bruno.

"The motive is resale. Thieves know they can get a couple thousand dollars for them," she says.