Gwendolyn Purdom
November 06, 2017 2:24 pm

With its signature emphasis on the uncomfortable, Larry David’s comedy can be awkward, and sometimes difficult, to watch. It certainly was for a lot of people on November 4th when the Curb Your Enthusiasm creator and star hosted Saturday Night Live and included a controversial joke about hitting on women in a concentration camp during the Holocaust in his opening monologue.

David, who is Jewish, first touched on the growing Harvey Weinstein allegations in his routine (another sensitive topic some viewers took issue with), then went on to imagine how he might have gone about picking up women had he been in a concentration camp during the Holocaust.

Social media lit up with responses to the Seinfeld co-creator’s edgy remarks.

While some classified the joke as classic David dark humor, many others felt it went way too far. The Holocaust, many argued, is never something that’s okay to joke about. Like Jonathan Greenblatt, the CEO of the anti-semitism-fighting Anti-Defamation League, who weighed in on Twitter:

The suggestion David made in his monologue that many of the men being accused of sexual assault in the wake of the Weinstein scandal are Jewish was also, understandably, decried as problematic.

Considering all of the above, some are calling on David — who’s known for being self-deprecating and has incorporated themes about his Jewish faith into his comedy in the past — to apologize.

Saturday Night Live is no stranger to controversy. Viewers complained that the show crossed a line when Sinead O’Connor tore up a photo of the Pope in 1992Martin Lawrence was never asked back to host after he went off-script during his raunchy monologue in ’94, and many other shocking moments put the late night program in hot water throughout the years.

So far, there’s been no statement from David’s camp or NBC on this controversy, but it’s certainly got a lot of other people talking.

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