Meaghan Kirby
August 30, 2017 10:46 am

Warning, the following post contains spoilers for the seventh season finale of Game of Thrones, “The Dragon and The Wolf.” If you *still* haven’t gotten around to seeing it yet, what are you waiting for? Get your butt over to HBO now because there is still so much drama to unpack.

We can’t even begin to pick one favorite moment from the finale, but it’s safe to say that the closing minutes were the most rattling. After spending 76 minutes in parts of Westeros as many of our favorite characters struggled to come to a temporary truce, we found ourselves back at The Wall with Tormund and Beric Dondarrion — as the Army of the Dead *finally* approached.

But the episode didn’t end there. As Beric and Tormund watched the army of the dead, out of nowhere, the undead Viserion, ridden by the Night King, flew in and torched the wall with his blue flames. And with that, The Wall had been breached.

HBO

It was certainly a dramatic way to end the season, especially given that the entire episode had pretty much taken place *far* away from The Wall, (temporarily) safely away from the Army of the Dead. While we can’t confirm his safety, it sure looks like Tormund was in the wrong place at the wrong time when everything came tumbling down.

HBO

In fact, at the time, we were so distracted by having to wait a year (or more) for Tormund’s fate, we completely missed this hidden detail that has us shaken to our core.

As the Army of the Dead march south of the wall in formation, through the gap created by Viserion’s flames, they appear to take the shape of something we’ve come to know very well thanks to Game of Thrones. Thanks to redditor I_did_not_Reddit, who pointed it out in a post, the army of the dead formation appears to take the shape of the Stark sigil — a direwolf.

HBO

Look familiar?

HBO

Like the Stark sigil facing backwards, maybe?

Now that we agree that the army of the dead is definitely taking the shape of the Stark sigil, it’s time to speculate exactly what that means. Naturally, many see this as proof that Bran is actually the Night King. Others, however, think it’s a direct threat to the young Stark, who has been tracking the progress of the White Walkers with his army of ravens throughout the season. And thanks to an ominous glance from the Night King early in the season, not to mention that scene last season, it’s clear he knows he’s being watched by the Three-Eyed Raven.

While we’ll likely spend the next year and a half or so speculating about what this actually means on Game of Thrones, it’s clear that it was meant to be threatening…and ambiguous.

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