Krista Jensen
February 07, 2017 4:44 pm
Universal Pictures

We’ve read the books, we’ve seen the movie…what else is there left to do but endlessly comb the internet for any and all facts we can find out about Christian Grey? Well, here’s a good one: according to Cosmo, there could be a Fifty Shades miniseries one day, like, for real. In an article titled “11 Totally Satisfying Behind-the-Scenes Facts” about Fifty Shades, the films’ director James Foley let loose a little and let us in on some super juicy secrets. For starters, we were incredibly close to seeing Jamie Dornan’s…manhood. Like, last-five-minutes of Gone Girl style. Did it happen? No, but all parties were down for the peepshow if it were to happen. Only on this set, ladies and gents!

Most important of all: Director James Foley let us know about the potential for a Fifty Shades miniseries…and now we need one.

“I suggested to [Erika Mitchell, aka E.L. James, the author of the book series] that, in a couple years, she could do a miniseries, like on Netflix or Amazon, and expand on [the story] a lot since there’s so much in the books” Foley told Cosmo.  “She understands movie-making, understands that certain things have to be taken out just because of the pace — but I think she’d like it if it could be a much more complete thing.” Keep mentioning it, Mr. Foley! If she’s on the fence, she could always delve into the literal ocean of fanfic out there for episode ideas.

The author was on set for the first film each and every day, and it sounds like the chemistry between director and source material author was as important as that between Christian and Ana. Foley says they’d talk about scenes as they filmed: “sometimes [Mitchell’d] say something and I’d say, ‘Good idea!’ And sometimes I’d say, ‘No I don’t think that’s going to work in the movie.’ And she’d say, ‘OK.’ It was not one moment of a fight. And we’re pals now.” Sounds like good grounds for more projects..?

So when’s this miniseries coming out, hm? Don’t toy with us — we know this book doesn’t shy away from exploring the art of a good tease, but we don’t want it. We want details, now.

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