*Those* scenes couldn't just be filmed on a whim.

Olivia Harvey
Feb 26, 2021 @ 3:00 pm
Advertisement
Bridgerton
Credit: Netflix

Once Bridgerton audiences caught their breath after watching one of those scenes that occurred after Episode 5, many wondered how Regé-Jean Page and Phoebe Dynevor were able to, well, act those scenes out. The explicit nature of the sex scenes in Bridgerton could not be filmed on a whim—the show relied on intimacy coordinator Lizzy Talbot to make sure actors' needs were met, comfort and trust was at the forefront, and that realism was achieved through a series of choreographed motions. Sorry, viewers. That perceived passion was, in fact, all part of the ploy.

Talbot told The Times in a February 25th interview that her work with the actors on any set begins with establishing boundaries. "We need to work out consent boundaries," she said. "It might be that we are working with containers, like, 'You can put your hand from the top of my neck to the top of my lower back or anywhere in between. You've got freedom to do what you want in that area, but it doesn't go anywhere else.'"

Once these boundaries are set, the choreography begins. "When you're treating the intimacy scenes in the same way that you are treating the stunt rehearsals, as you are treating the dance rehearsals, it takes the awkwardness and the fear out of them because it's just another scene at that point," she continued.

On a show that is as steamy as Bridgerton, Talbot said it's incredibly important to have an intimacy coordinator on board. "Everyone was relying on the good graces of their scene partner and the good intentions of their director, but that's the safety net, and you can see for so many people that just wasn't enough," she said of the project before she hopped on.

Having seen Talbot's ability to choreograph such, uh, passionate intimacy scenes in the first season of the show, we're more than ready to see her skills put to work come Season 2.