Madison Vanderberg
November 10, 2017 12:26 pm

When Taylor Swift began her Reputation promo, the general public liked her singles, but they weren’t the crowd-pleasing radio bangers she used to serve up. If anyone was wondering if she saved her best for the album, they would be absolutely correct in that assumption. So far, the critics love Reputation.

Rolling Stone: “Instead, she’s playing for bigger emotional stakes – this is an album full of one-on-one adult love songs. That’s a daring swerve from a songwriter who’s scored so many brilliant hits about pursuing the next romantic high”

The Guardian: “At the heart of Reputation lies a sequence of songs that chart the rise, fall and fallout of a fleeting relationship and offer a masterclass in pop songwriting along the way.”

New York Times: “The bombastic, unexpected, sneakily potent Reputation is many things: It’s the first album on which Ms. Swift has cursed (‘damn’ doesn’t count); it’s the first time she has sung about consuming alcohol (and repeatedly at that); and it’s the vehicle for her most overt songs about sexual agency. Ms. Swift is 27 now, and the things she used to deny herself — in song, at least — are no more.”

Swift is reposting her best reviews on her Instagram.

The Telegraph: “Reputation is a big, brash, all-guns-blazing blast of weaponized pop that grapples with the vulnerability of the human heart as it is pummelled by 21st-century fame.”

Metro UK: “Reputation proves once again that Swift is still — at her peaks — one of the best pop lyricists and melodists of a generation. Let’s see where she goes next…”

Billboard: “Reputation is her most sonically ambitious album to date, a sort of a funhouse-mirror version of 1989 with a devil-may-care approach to its big hooks.”

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