Alim Kheraj
March 09, 2017 4:13 am
HBO

She’s already proven that she’s a badass female by playing Daenerys Targaryen, and now Emilia Clarke has written a feminist essay where she says she doesn’t “need to justify” her nude scenes in Game of Thrones

Clarke wrote a powerful essay titled “The New Sexy” as part of Huffington Post‘s All Women Everywhere project, which aims to celebrate women all over the world. In the essay, Clarke touched upon some important topics, such as spreading kindness, gender equality, and how, at times, she feels guilty about not using her platform everyday to help progress women’s rights.

“Because being kind is showing someone that they are seen and heard, and that they do indeed matter,” she said. “And that’s sexy.”

In her essay, Emilia Clarke also spoke about how she was tired of feeling like she needed to justify her nudity in Game of Thrones.

Continuing, Clarke went on to say that she felt that the roles that she has taken on have “given me an insight into what it feels like to be a woman who stands up to inequality and hate, and stands out as a feminist.”

“That aside, it hasn’t stopped me from walking away from situations and people who have assumed I am weak because I’m a woman; it has forced me to stand by my actions and be ok with the consequences,” she added.

This isn’t the first time that Emilia Clarke has spoken up about her nudity in Game of Thrones, with the actor previously noting that she would never do anything that was gratuitous.

“Sometimes explicit scenes are required and make sense for the characters/story, as they do in Westeros,” she wrote in an Instagram post. “If it’s gratuitous for gratuitous sake, then I will discuss with a director on how to make it more subtle. In either case, like a good Mother of Dragons, I’m always in control.” 

Tbh, given that Emilia Clarke is a true khaleesi, we have no doubt that she is fully in control, and we totally agree with her that she doesn’t need to justify her creative actions in any way shape or form.

You can read Emilia Clarke’s full feminist essay here.

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