Sammy Nickalls
October 16, 2015 1:58 pm

Late in August, The Girl In The Spider’s Web, the first book of the Millennium series to be penned by an author that is not Stieg Larsson, hit shelves. The first three best-sellers were published posthumously after Larsson passed away due to a heart attack in 2004. Larsson used his experience in crime reporting to spin a tale about the brilliant hacker and crime-solver Lisbeth Salander, and after he passed, Swedish journalist David Lagercrantz decided to pick up the mantle and continue on with the series we all know and love.

It turns out this year is (debatably) full of good news for those who love the Millennium series. The Girl In The Spider’s Web was originally published on August 27th, and we all were wondering if this would be the last of it, but turns out it won’t be the last crime Lisbeth will solve. In a statement released from the publisher Nordstedts, Lagercrantz plans on penning not one, but two more books in the series. “It’s been so much fun to write and such a breathtaking adventure,” he said in the statement.

Lagercrantz’s latest topped best-seller lists in both the U.S. and Europe with a whopping 80 million copies sold all over the world in just the month-and-a-half it has been out on the shelves. And Lagercrantz has ambitious goals for the next two: he hopes to have book five out in 2017 and book six in 2019.

  

Naturally, not everyone is thrilled about the posthumous continuation of Larsson’s work — namely, his longtime partner, Eva Gabrielsson, who compares Lagercrantz’s actions to the contentious publication of Go Set A Watchman. “I’m quite angry about it,” Gabrielsson told New York Times in August. “I don’t think it’s the right thing to do to a dead author. Sequels never turn out very well, because authors are so constrained; they’re not free to move around in the material.”

Gabrielsson explained that she thinks the trilogy should be left alone. “I think about the readers. They got to know a fantastic writer who becomes like an old friend,” she told the Times. “And now they say, ‘Your old friend is gone but we’ll give you a blind date, and be happy’. . . They say they are doing this for the readers, and all kinds of nonsense. They don’t want to say: ‘We want money. We want fame. We want to walk the red carpet again.’” Controversial indeed. Will you be reading?

Related reading: 

How I fell back in love with reading books

The 40 books every woman should read

(Image via Columbia Pictures)

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