Rachel Paige
February 18, 2015 11:24 am

Dr. Seuss has taught us so many important life lessons, all while never breaking rhyme. Together we’ve tackled such conundrums like green eggs and ham (and whether or not we like them), we’ve counted fish, stolen Christmas, learned how to speak for the trees, and had “lots of good fun that is funny.” But, Dr. Seuss never helped us figure out what pet we should get. A newly-discovered, unpublished Dr. Seuss book though is all about that conundrum and thank goodness we now have his opinion on the matter.

Theodor Seuss Geisel passed away in 1991, and he left behind some unpublished manuscripts and illustrations. His widow, Audrey, happened to stumble upon these words and illustrations tucked away in Seuss’ office when she was remodeling her home in 2013. And now, What Pet Should I Get? is being released for all of us to cherish. The book’s manuscript is complete — that means full text and illustrations, all done by Dr. Seuss himself. Associate publishing director Cathy Goldsmith thinks that What Pet Should I Get? was likely written sometime between the years of 1958 and 1962. Now in 2015, it’s going to see the light of day.

“While undeniably special, it is not surprising to me that we found this because Ted always worked on multiple projects and started new things all the time — he was constantly writing and drawing and coming up with ideas for new stories,” Audrey said in a statement from Random House.

We think this is pretty special, too. It’s also not the only thing that was discovered in the house during the remodel, so there might even be more Dr. Seuss books to come. This one will be published on July 28th of this year, and actually features the same brother and sister team from One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish.

It’s probably time we start brushing up on our rhyming to get in the proper groove.

Also maybe ask your little siblings and nieces and nephews if you can crash a late July story time to get in on a live read of What Pet Should I Get? Unless you’re brave enough to tell the cashier at Barnes & Noble that you’re totally buying this book for yourself.

Images via here and here.

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