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Caitlin Flynn
April 14, 2017 2:49 pm

Book lovers, I hope you’re sitting down, because we have some potentially life-changing news — Jules Verne’s time capsule may have been discovered in France. Archaeologists and historians recently unearthed the metal box, which dates back to the late 1800s — and on April 4th, researchers from Paris Descartes University and The Explorers Club NYC suggested that the box may have belonged to Verne.

The time capsule contains “documents, books and metal objects of different sizes and shapes,” and it could potentially hold unpublished work from the iconic sci-fi novelist.

Verne is best known for penning classics Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea, Journey to the Center of the Earth, and Around the World in Eighty Days.

After studying Verne’s tomb, researchers unearthed the the time capsule near the French Pyrenees in southern France.

"The investigation started thanks to the meticulous study of the works of Jules Verne and, in particular, analysis of the famous author's tomb," according to an April 4th press release. "With all of the material collected and using complex geolocation algorithms, the team was able to identify the area in which they might find some kind of object associated with Verne."

Although the capsule hasn’t yet been conclusively linked to Verne, archaeologist Elouan Beauséjour told Metro that he plans to hold a press conference soon to provide an update and further information.

As of this week, the research endeavor is in its second phase — every item in the capsule is being thoroughly examined and analyzed. Is it possible unpublished Verne works will be available to the public in the future? Be still, our hearts.

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