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Olivia Harvey
June 12, 2017 2:16 pm

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again — if we were forced to compete in the Hunger Games, we ~for sure~ wouldn’t last long. But 12-year-old Megan Gething would stand an excellent chance at winning. We say that because Gething used a first-aid tip she learned from The Hunger Games, in real life.

Gething and her friend, Mackenzie George, were playing in a marsh in Gloucester, Massachusetts when George slipped and gashed open her leg on a jagged piece of metal.

"I didn’t feel anything," George told the Gloucester Times. "I thought I just bumped my leg, but when I pulled it up I saw the cut, and I started screaming to call 911."

Gething sent their other friend, Zoe Tallgrass, to get help while Gething used her first-aid knowledge to fashion a tourniquet out of a pair of shorts — something she read about Katniss doing for Peeta in the first Hunger Games novel.

"I figured it was a well-known method of stopping bleeding," Gething told the Gloucester Times. It turns out that she was absolutely correct!

Gething tied the pair of shorts tightly around George’s wounded calf and stopped the bleeding while the girls waited for help to arrive. Luckily, Tallgrass and her father and brother returned to the scene in about three minutes.

Mr. Tallgrass and his son carried George back to the house, where an ambulance picked her up and took her to the hospital.

George required surgery to mend the 10-inch cut on her leg, but her doctors expect a full recovery in about a month. Her parents are more than thankful for Gething’s heroism and first-aid knowledge.

"We want to celebrate what she did and what an amazing kid she is," Mr. George commented. "And how incredible it is, without any formal training, to be able to stay calm in such a stressful situation. It's just amazing. We thank God that she was there to help out, and we're very appreciative that she did."

Katniss (and Hunger Games author, Suzanne Collins) would be proud of you, Megan!

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