Shaunna Murphy
February 02, 2017 6:14 am
Twitter/Beyoncefan666

Wednesday, February 1st was a day full of high highs (Bey is preg!) and extremely low lows (are we at war with Australia, now?), but somehow the weirdest thing to happen was this Beyoncé fan Twitter account, that “predicted” her pregnancy announcement… back in July.

Right after Bey made the glorious, much needed announcement that she and her husband, Shawn Carter (he will be just Shawn to us forever after Lemonade), had been “blessed two times over,” tweets from the seemingly-psychic Twitter account @beyoncefan666 began to go viral. Because not only had this Beyoncé, Gaga, and Donald Trump-focused account mentioned Bey’s pregnancy on January 28th, they mentioned it long, long ago, in the before time.

In fact, the account almost entirely consists of predictions about the three figures listed above that later came true.

Like Bey performing at the Video Music Awards on August 28th.

They even knew it would be a medley!

They also predicted when Gaga would release Joanne.

…And her Super Bowl performance.

It’s also important to note that this account predicted the UK Brexit.

It’s all pretty eerie at first glance, but as Guardian pointed out, there’s a pretty simple solution to how this all went down. @Beyoncefan666 likely tweeted out multiple possibilities that could play out in different scenarios, like the US election and the UK Brexit, back when their account was still private. All of the freaked out responses to their tweets were posted today and yesterday, so the popular theory is they only went public once Bey released her pregnancy announcement.

A similar tactic was used in 2014 by an account called “Fifa Corruption” that “predicted” major World Cup events, but followers with fast fingers screen-grabbed evidence of the account posting multiple outcomes before deleting them.

So, sorry guys — @Beyoncefan666 is probably a fake, and in other news, the Easter Bunny isn’t real, either. But we appreciate their efforts, and will keep our eyes peeled to their account in the days to come, hoping they prove us wrong.

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