Trilby Beresford
June 01, 2016 1:32 pm
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Dealing with the occasional pesky headache is bad enough, but suffering from migraine headaches is something else altogether. According to the American Migraine Foundation, the symptoms of a migraine can be disabling for some people, causing them to miss work, lose productivity, and even experience depression and other pain conditions. In regards to women sufferers in particular, a recent study in the medical journal BMJ suggested that they may be at greater risk of cardiovascular (heart) disease.

For the Nurses Health Study II, researchers analyzed data on 115, 541 women, with ages ranging from 25-42. Among those women, 15% suffered from migraines. At the beginning, all these women were free from cardiovascular disease and chest pain. Then over 20 years of follow-up, 223 of the women died from cardiovascular disease, and 1329 suffered heart attacks or strokes. Those with migraines were suggested to be at a 50% greater risk of succumbing to a heart attack, stroke, or requiring heart surgery for blocked arteries. Of course, the study adjusted for other potential factors that could sway the results, such as smoking, age, and high blood pressure.

The result of the study indicated a consistent link between migraines and cardiovascular disease, and suggested that women who suffer from migraines should have regular check-ups for their vascular health risks. If you are a woman and you do suffer from migraines, there is no need to be alarmed, though. This is simply information to be aware of, and every adult should be having complete health check-ups on a regular basis — regardless of their history with migraines.

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