Sammy Nickalls
November 11, 2015 9:05 am

Now that it’s November, Christmas is almost here. And we all love a good Christmas sweater, especially an “ugly” Christmas sweater reserved for the most fabulous ugly sweater parties around the holidays. But when that Christmas sweater suggests the trivialization of mental illness? That’s when the holiday spirit starts to dwindle. Unfortunately, that’s exactly why Target is coming under fire.

Recently, Twitter user Kate Gannon tweeted a photograph of a Target sweater that reads “OCD: Obsessive Christmas Disorder.” “Hey @Target,” Gannon wrote, “this sweater isn’t cute or funny. OCD is a serious illness that shouldn’t be mocked.”

A sweater that appears to make light of obsessive compulsive disorder, which affects 2.2 million Americans, isn’t going over well at all. And that’s why ever since it appeared Target’s website, many have taken to social media to express their outrage.

Thus far, Target has been responding to publication inquiries with the following statement:

However, the company has been responding to tweets saying that they’ve “shared the feedback” with their team.

Target isn’t the only retailer to use this phrase, as AdWeek points out. People have also been calling out Cracker Barrel for selling products with the slogan, as well as a sign that says “I’ll be home for Christmas and in therapy by New Year’s.”

We’re sure that Target simply intended to provide a lighthearted Christmas sweater, but intentions aside, making light of such a serious issue that affects so many people all over the world can be hurtful. Mental illness faces enough stigma as it is, and it’s something that needs to be taken seriously, especially by major companies that wield such widespread influence.

Target has handled various issues, including gender-neutral signage and store-wide breastfeeding policies, with awesome understanding and grace. Here’s hoping they come to a decision about the product that takes into account the concerns of their customers.

(Image via Target.)

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