"I think it will be worth the wait," Gomez tweeted.

Olivia Harvey
Jan 15, 2021 @ 11:21 am
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Credit: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic, Getty Images

Selena Gomez is up to something. Mere hours after posting the music video for a brand new Spanish-language song "De Una Vez" (At Once), Gomez retweeted herself from 2011 hinting to a Spanish-language record that has literally been almost exactly 10 years in the making. And obviously, fans aren't going to be okay any time soon.

"I think it will be worth the wait," Gomez tweeted, quote tweeting a post from 2011 that reads, "Can't wait for y'all to hear the Spanish record ;) it's sounding so cool." Her retweet has already racked up over 150,000 likes and counting since she posted it yesterday, January 14th.

In late 2010, Gomez dropped a Spanish-language song titled "Un Año Sin Lluvia" (A Year Without Rain) when she was still with The Scene. It was January 2011 when she teased a Spanish-language record, which meant she was probably working on more tracks to coincide with "Un Año Sin Lluvia," but that album never came to fruition.

She was then featured in DJ Snake's 2018 track "Taki Taki," in which she sang a Spanish verse, but we're finally getting the real deal with "De Una Vez" and its fellow Spanish tracks.

This tweet was published a few hours after she dropped her Spanish-language single "De Una Vez," which is sitting comfortably at over 5 million views less than 24 hours after it debuted. If we're reading between the lines correctly, "De Una Vez" is just a sampling of a full Spanish-language album waiting in the wings.

Okay, 2021. We see you, and we feel you.

Twitter is on fire due to the music video drop and Gomez alluding to a full Spanish-language record. It's something we've all been waiting for for nearly a decade. Could Gomez be planning to release the full album on January 17th, making it a full 10 years to the date since she first tweeted about her Spanish record?

Man, we hope so.

Yes, Gomez is certainly up to something, and we cannot wait to see—no, hear—what it is.