Sammy Nickalls
July 16, 2015 8:41 am

You only need a few minutes to make a huge impact on someone’s life. That’s what 19-year-old server Brendan Motill learned a couple weeks ago while assisting a customer at Smokey Barque in downtown Frankfort, Illinois. It was a slow day at work that day, so Brendan was chatting with the anonymous man about his life and recent move to Frankfort.

The conversation lasted not even 10 minutes, but it clearly had a huge impact on the customer. . . because after Brendan delivered his $20.31 bill, the man tipped him one thousand dollars.

“Thanks for your kind service!” he wrote in a note he left along with the tip. “You’re doing a great job as a server. I don’t know what your hopes and dreams are in this life, but I hope this tip helps.”

The man further explained that he tries to extend a helping hand when he can to brighten others’ days. “My hope is that people were more peaceful to each other,” he continued in the note. “The world can be so negative, I commit random acts of kindness to let others know there can be another way.”

Brendan was so shocked that he didn’t even totally believe what he was seeing when he looked at the bill. He called over a coworker to double check for him. “It was really emotional,” he explained to Frankfort Patchwhich first reported the story. “I had to take a second and calm down.”

Brendan, a graduate of Tinley Park High School, plans to use the money to go to college to pursue accounting. “[The money] is really going to help me with my dreams,” he told Frankfort Patch.

We’re loving this amazing generosity that’s been spreading the globe in the tipping world this year — like the former student who left a $3,000 tip in honor of a beloved teacher, or the customer who left a $2,000 tip to be split amongst the chef, restaurant owner, and server. It just goes to show that the world is a wonderful, beautiful place — and that you never know what kind of an impact you can leave on a stranger.

(Image via)

Related:

An 8 year old’s amazing acts of kindness

This school is challenging students to 100 acts of kindness

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