Anna Sheffer
April 10, 2019 8:53 am

Since taking office, President Donald Trump has repeatedly tried to enact a travel ban targeting people from several Muslim-majority countries. This policy has been condemned by many as Islamophobic, and several federal courts even blocked the rule from taking effect—until the Supreme Court voted to uphold it in June 2018. Now, several members of Congress are fighting back by introducing legislation called the NO BAN Act.

Newsweek reports that Democratic Representative Judy Chu and Democratic Senator Chris Coons introduced the bill on April 10th. Several other members of Congress are supporting the bill, including Representatives Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib, the first Muslim women to serve in Congress. The full name of the NO BAN Act is the National Origin-Based Antidiscrimination for Nonimmigrants Act, and it seeks to put an end to Trump’s travel ban. The ACLU notes that the bill would require the government to be able to provide “credible facts” and point to “specific acts” that have occurred if it wants to ban certain groups of people from entry. It would also help stop future Muslim bans by prohibiting discrimination of immigrants based on religion.

Omar tweeted about the NO BAN Act on April 9th, writing:

Others have been talking about the bill, too.

According to the civil rights group Muslim Advocates, 384 civil rights, faith, national security, and community organizations have endorsed the bill in a joint letter, which they sent to Congress. Among the groups are the NAACP, Human Rights Campaign, the United Methodist Church, and United We Dream.

“Regrettably, the Muslim Ban validates the worst stereotypes about Muslims; that they are inherently foreign and violent and pose such a threat to the United States they should be banned,” the letter reads. “The ban on Muslims comes after generations of politicians hostile to religious minorities have attempted to ban Jews, Catholics, and Latter-day Saints. Congress now has an opportunity to take action against the Muslim Ban and this troubling history by sending a strong message that our nation rejects religious bigotry.”

We’re so glad to see these lawmakers and organizations taking a stand against the discriminatory travel ban. The faith you practice shouldn’t disqualify you from coming to the United States. If you feel strongly about stopping the ban, contact your elected officials and let them know.

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