Lia Beck
March 19, 2020 11:31 am
Daniel Zuchnik, Getty Images

A celebrity making a song about a pandemic might sound like a recipe for disaster. But singer JoJo wrote a song about coronavirus (COVID-19) that hits all the right notes—and shares the right guidelines for keeping people safe. Not only that, but the song is also written to the beat of her 2004 hit “Leave (Get Out).” This is actually a recipe for increasing our love and respect for JoJo.

The 29-year-old posted her minute-long song to TikTok, but it made its way to Twitter, where it’s gotten even more fans. The account @antferny posted it with the caption “GIVE @IAMJOJO A GRAMMY,” and the post already has 11K likes. JoJo also retweeted VH1’s post of the video, adding a cry-laughing emoji.

So, what does JoJo sing about in her COVID-19-themed remix? Well, she starts out by calling the virus a “nasty bitch.” True. She calls people who are still going to bars immature. Also true. And she pleads, “Tell me why you’re acting so confused when the CDC laid it out for you.” Tell ’em, JoJo.

The real kicker is the chorus: “Stay in! Right now! Do it for humanity! I’m deadass about that, but we will survive.”

Yep, everyone: The year 2020 has bought us a song about a global catastrophe set to “Leave (Get Out),” written and performed by JoJo herself, that contains the word “deadass.” That’s a lesson to stop trying to predict anything in life right there.

In addition to spreading awareness through her TikTok remix, JoJo will also be contributing to coronavirus relief by participating in a live performance with Billboard at 1 p.m. ET/10 a.m. PT on Thursday, March 19th. Her set will air on Billboard’s Facebook page and is meant to raise money for My Friend’s Place, which supports homeless youth.

JoJo is making a positive impact, keeping us entertained, and getting an early aughts song about a 13-year-old with a cheating boyfriend stuck in our heads. What can’t she do?

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, HelloGiggles is committed to providing accurate and helpful coverage to our readers. As such, some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage you to use online resources from CDC, WHO, and local public health departments, and visit our coronavirus hub.

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