Kathryn Lindsay
November 02, 2015 6:26 am

Last month, Jennifer Lawrence penned a powerful essay, published in Lenny Letter about the gender pay gap in Hollywood, and the backlash she faced for speaking up on the job.

“All I hear and see all day are men speaking their opinions, and I give mine in the same exact manner, and you would have thought I had said something offensive,” she wrote at the time.

Whether you’re a super-famous actress or not, this is something so many women can relate to—and the outpouring of support for Lawrence’s essay was proof of that.

However, one publication called her essay “bratty,” reducing her thoughtful position on Hollywood’s gender inequality issues to a childish tantrum. Most people would be a little be hurt, or frustrated by that kind of dismissive feedback, but not J-Law.

This past weekend, at a press conference with her Hunger Games co-stars, Lawrence talked about how statements like that just further prove the point she was making in her essay.

Nina Jacobson, a Hunger Games producer, backed up her point:

It can be hard to speak up, especially when it’s likely that our voices will be met with sexist opposition—but that’s exactly why it’s so important. J-Law’s fearlessness is bringing awareness not just to the issue of equal pay, but to the issue of the treatment of women in the workplace, in general.

It’s been proven in multiple studies that when women speak up, especially with regards to salary, they’re punished or judged for being vocal—while men don’t face the same kind of scrutiny. And so, the vicious cycle that needs to be broken continues. It’s so important that we recognize that these gendered interpretations exist and that we counteract them by highlighting examples when they happen. And this weekend, the razor-sharp, ever-awesome Lawrence did just that. Yet again.

(Image via Shutterstock.com)

Related:

Jennifer Lawrence’s essay on Hollywood’s wage gape problem

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