Caroline Goldstein
Updated May 27, 2020 @ 1:01 pm
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Elective surgeries are beginning to resume in California, and Chrissy Teigen is taking full advantage by getting her breast implants removed. People making choices about their bodies that make them feel happy and healthy? We love to see it.

Less ideal: Teigen had to share the news of her surgery due to backlash she received after tweeting a video of herself receiving a coronavirus test. Some people interpreted that as flexing her privilege, despite the fact that Los Angeles County is offering free coronavirus testing to all residents, whether they’re displaying symptoms or not—which Teigen clarified to a few critics on Twitter.

But she went into further detail on a May 26th Instagram post, where she explained that she had to get a COVID-19 test because she’s “getting surgery soon.”

“A lot of people are understandably curious (and nosey!) so I’ll just say it here: I’m getting my boobs out!” Teigen wrote.

She continued, explaining some of the reasons for her decision: “They’ve been great to me for many years but I’m just over it. I’d like to be able to zip a dress in my size, lay on my belly with pure comfort! No biggie!”

In the March 2020 cover story for Glamour UK, Teigen said that she got her breast implants when she was 20—at which time she didn’t have (or need, TBH) the foresight to consider how pregnancy would affect her implants.

“It was more for a swimsuit thing,” she told the magazine. “I thought, if I’m going to be posing, laid on my back, I want them to be perky! But then you have babies and they fill up with milk and deflate and now I am screwed.”

Later in the interview, she said that she “[wants] them out now” (though she wouldn’t rule out a lift). And now, that time has come.

“I’ll still have boobs, they’ll just be pure fat. Which is all a tit is in the first place. A dumb, miraculous bag of fat,” Teigen concluded her Instagram post.

And that’s that on that.

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, HelloGiggles is committed to providing accurate and helpful coverage to our readers. As such, some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage you to use online resources from CDC, WHO, and local public health departments, and visit our coronavirus hub.