Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic
Anna Gragert
May 04, 2016 2:59 pm

In the United States alone, the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders reports that about 30 million people cope with an eating disorder. What’s equally as unfortunate is that eating disorders have the highest mortality rate when looking at every mental illness out there. That’s why the Eating Recovery Center dubbed May 3rd to be Eating Recovery Day.

This event is “dedicated to building greater awareness of the pervasive nature of eating disorders and inspiring hope for recovery.” To help them with their mission, Fuller House‘s Candace Cameron Bure appeared on the #EatingRecoveryDay panel to discuss her battle with bulimia.

“My story started surprisingly not when I was on television as a child. [It began] when I stopped working on Full House and had a major transition in my life,” Candace explained. She adds that, at the age of 20,  she moved to Montreal to support her husband and his hockey career. Such an adjustment greatly affected Candace, who revealed, “With the change of having worked since I was 5 years old, to now becoming a wife and soon-to-be mom, and living in a city where I didn’t have friends and family around me, I really lost the sense of who I was.”

When her husband would go off to work and Candace was left home alone, she looked to food to fill the silence. Unfortunately, this soon took a turn for the worse. “I got into a cycle of binge-eating and feeling so much guilt and shame for that that I would start purging,” stated Bure. “Without even knowing, it soon just took over.”

In the name of recovery, Candace looked to her pastor and those around her for help. She told Women’s Health that having trustworthy people in her life is essential, so she can feel free to be honest and not keep harmful secrets. In fact, the recommends that others coping with an eating disorder work on sharing their own secrets because “it’s the very thing that will free you.” In turn, she advises others to listen to such secrets, to be compassionate, and to avoid being dismissive.

Ultimately, if you or someone you know is coping with an eating disorder, there are plenty of resources out there. You can visit the National Eating Disorders Association website for more or call their live helpline – Monday thru Friday, from 8:30am to 4:30pm – at 1-(800)-931-2237

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