Anna Gragert
June 08, 2016 2:43 pm
The Young Mummy / www.facebook.com

Australian mom blogger Sophie Cachia is aware that women aren’t supposed to share pregnancy news before the 12-week mark because that’s when miscarriages are most likely to occur. However, Sophia ignored this suggestion, shared the news at the 9-week mark, and told Mamamia, “[I]f something was to go wrong, if I was to experience a miscarriage with this pregnancy – whether it be in the next three weeks or even after – then I would share it anyway.

The very first person Sophie confided in was a best friend who fully supported her decision to share the news early. The friend explained, “My family and friends all knew I was pregnant as soon as I pissed on the stick because of the shitty time I went through alone the two miscarriages before.” She told Sophie that making such an announcement was important to her because of the support she required – especially since pretending you were never pregnant can be both isolating and painful.

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Though Sophie initially wanted to share the news early, she soon felt it was something she needed to do. “Societal norms prevent us from freely announcing pregnancy until after the 12-week mark. Yet, my daily life revolves around sharing incredibly intimate details of my world,” Sophie wrote on Mamamia. “I would share the heartache, I would share the tears, and I would share my first experience of losing a baby. That’s what [my blog] The Young Mummy is all about.” Overall, on her blog, Sophie aims to share both the good and the bad because that’s what life is all about.

Though she’s not proposing all women open up in the same manner, Sophie is suggesting that it should be perfectly acceptable if a woman does want to talk about such things. She states, “Can’t we as women have control over our bodies and thus make our own decisions? One in four pregnancies end in miscarriage, and women’s silence means that rate is likely to be even higher.

Rather than surrounding miscarriages with shame and silence, Sophie stresses that women instead need support when coping with such a loss. That’s exactly why she opted to not keep her pregnancy hidden away.

If you are coping with a miscarriage, the Miscarriage Association has plenty of resources that are available to you. There’s also the American Pregnancy Helpline, which can be reached at 1-866-942-6466. To learn more about surviving a miscarriage, the American Pregnancy Association has more information.

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