Karen Fratti
April 21, 2017 2:31 pm
Pixabay

In order to get her birth certificate amended to match her gender, one very brave transgender woman is suing Idaho, and her efforts could, hopefully, change the discriminatory laws in the state regarding transgender identification. The woman, identified only as F.V., filed a lawsuit with Lambda Legal after trying to change the gender on her birth certificate.

The 28-year-old woman lives in Hawaii now, but was born in Boise, so had to head back “home” to get her documents in order. At the federal office, the lawsuit alleges that she was called derogatory names like “tranny” and “faggot.” Idaho — along with Kansas, Ohio, and Tennessee — are the only states that don’t allow transgender individuals to change the gender listed on their birth certificate (though Idaho does allow people to change the gender on their drivers license). But don’t be fooled: Most states that allow it also require that the individual provide proof of a gender reassignment surgery, even though many transgender people don’t want, or can’t afford, gender reassignment.

Routine reminder: Surgery has nothing to do with one’s gender.

Which is exactly one of the issues that F.V. is taking up in her lawsuit. Not only is she suing for discrimination and for the right to change her gender on her own documents, she doesn’t want transgender people to have to prove anything to get the gender changed.

Some states also require that people show a birth certificate with the gender assigned at birth to change any of their documents. But that could essentially out transgender people who don’t need to be outed — they just need their gender changed on their IDs and birth certificate.

Lamba Legal issued a statement on F.V.’s behalf:

F.V.’s case is a big one, because if they “knock out” Idaho, according to the Transgender Law Center, there aren;t many more states to go to start making it easier for transgender people. It’s a long road, but thanks to brave women and men taking on the legal system, rights for transgender individuals are slowly, but surely, changing.

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