Chris Adamus/Unsplash
Ana Defillo
September 29, 2016 10:40 am

On Monday night we had our very first 2016 presidential debate and it was the trainwreck we all expected it to be. While our girl Hillary held it down when Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump unraveled before our very eyes, many issues were raised that we all need to know more about. Specifically, issues around race. On an almost daily basis, an unarmed black man or woman is killed by the police, Muslim and Latinx immigrants have been demonized and discriminated against, and the KKK has officially returned to the mainstream. None of this is OK. Things need to change. Like, yesterday. But in order for us to figure out effective and sustainable solutions to our country’s racial problems, we need to be on the same page about what those issues are. There are soooooooo many incredible activists tirelessly putting in the work and breaking it down for us online to learn. Here are a few of my favorites that I follow and I think you should too.

Sinyangwe is a Policy Analyst & Data Scientist with Campaign Zero, a comprehensive platform to end police violence. His tweets are always filled with lots of useful data and statistics on race in the U.S.

Originally from India, Kolhatkar is a journalist, activist, and artist. She is the founder, host, and executive producer of Pacifica’s Uprising with Sonali and Director of Afghan Women’s Mission. Her tweets range from race and politics to cooking.

Bogado is a justice writer at Grist and normally tweets about Native rights, immigration, and racial justice issues.

Jionde is a 22-year-old history graduate from Charlotte, North Carolina who recently went viral for posting some much-needed truth bombs on Twitter about racial history in the U.S. In addition to schooling the internet on U.S history, the young activist tweets pretty much about everything and anything, including bad-ass selfies.

Vega is a digital correspondent for CNNMoney where she discusses race and inequality in America. Before joining CNN, the young reporter wrote for the New York Times and created its race and ethnicity beat.

You May Like