Brianne Hogan
June 04, 2018 7:00 am
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It’s wedding season, so chances are you’ve sent back plenty of RSVPs already. If you’re a single person and looking to meet someone new, a wedding can be a great way to meet new people. Not sure how to go about it? Don’t sweat it. We’ve got you covered with our top tips for meeting someone when you’re single at a wedding (that don’t involve alcohol, because not everyone wants to get messy at the bar).

Weddings mean dancing, flirting, and good times all around, so they’re the perfect opportunity to meet other single people and form potential love connections.

“I know plenty of people who’ve met at weddings, whether they were part of the bridal party or a wedding guest,” Carmelia Ray, a professional matchmaker, online dating expert, and dating coach, told HelloGiggles.

So whether you’re seated at a Singles Table or not, here’s what you need to know in order to meet someone at your next wedding.

Be strategic

Depending on your relationship with the bride or groom, you can ask them to set you up or at least have you sit next to another single person and potential match.

“Before the wedding you can ask them if they are planning on having a singles table at their wedding,” said Ray. “You can be nonchalant and just say, ‘Pair me up with the single guy or girl who you think I’d have the most fun with.'” Have them do that work upfront, though, because they’ll be pretty busy on the day of the wedding.

Ray added, “If you can find a genuine opportunity at the wedding to have the bride or groom introduce you to someone, that’s great. But you also might want to say at that point, ‘Can you introduce us tomorrow or connect us after the wedding?’ so you’re not taking the attention away from their big day.”

Bust out those opening lines

Find someone who strikes your fancy? Then it’s time to break the ice. “A really easy one is asking, ‘Bride or groom?’ No matter what, you already will have a connection because you both know the couple,” said Ray. “Which leads to the next question, ‘How do you know them?'”

Other ice breakers include anything related to the wedding. “Talking about the food or the music is a great opener,” said Ray. “The key is to find something that you’re genuinely interested in — like food, for example — and open with that topic. It’s more authentic, which helps someone connect to the real you.”

If you’re both foodies, you can hit the buffet together and chat more in line, or maybe you’re into the music and want to hit the dance floor together. Whatever you discuss, find a way to turn your quick chat into a longer one.

Notice your body language

If you want to be approached, then you want to be approachable. In other words, “Don’t hide in a corner or be glued to your phone,” said Ray. “If you’re all about your phone, you’re going to miss opportunities to meet people and make eye contact.” Standing up straight gives you an air of confidence and makes you more approachable to potential matches.

Talk to everyone

To avoid feeling like you’re the “lame” single person there or looking too, umm, thirsty, Ray suggested,”Have the attitude that you want to get to know everyone there and have fun. Make it a game to get to know every person — from the grandparents to the flower girl — so that way it doesn’t make a difference who you’re striking up a conversation with.”

She added, “As a matchmaker, I always have the matchmaking brain on. So if you’re at an event and meeting all kinds of people, you can easily say, ‘Hey, I’m single. Do you know anyone?’ You never know — there could be a connection for you even outside of the wedding. ‘Oh, my nephew, John, would be perfect for you. Let me get your number.’ It’s totally great to put out there what you want because you never know.”

If you’re panicky and nervous about meeting new people, Ray says to remember all the other times you’ve successfully connected with someone and how good that made you feel. Maybe you won’t meet someone, maybe you will. It’s all okay. At the end of the day, focus on having fun with your friends because, if anything, enthusiasm is always contagious — and attractive.

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