Anna Gragert
March 04, 2016 4:15 pm
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While it may not be an uplifting topic, it is essential that we talk about breast cancer —especially how our close relationship to our bodies can potentially prevent or detect breast cancer. Which is why we’re so grateful to see one woman opening up about her personal experience with this disease, and how she discovered it.

When Kylie Armstrong was diagnosed with breast cancer, she was completely and utterly shocked. It all started when she paid a visit to her doctor and mentioned that her breast looked a bit different. Armstrong then lifted it up and revealed three, barely noticeable dimples underneath her breast.

“I felt no lump,” Armstrong states. “The GP felt no lump.”

Just to be sure that nothing was wrong, Kylie was sent to get a mammogram. However, there were no obvious signs of breast cancer, so she was then asked to undergo an ultrasound – just to be sure.

“The ultrasound found the cancer deep in my breast close to the muscle,” explains Armstrong.

Following these tragic results, Kylie took to Facebook to share her story. Along with a picture of the dimples on her breast, she writes, “Please take a good look at this photo. These 3 very, very subtle DIMPLES on the bottom of this breast are a sign of BREAST CANCER! This is what MY BREAST CANCER looks like.”

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Her meaningful reason for posting this image: “I am sharing this because I hope I can make people aware that Breast Cancer is not always a detectable lump.” Armstrong then advises readers to visit their doctor if they notice any change in their breasts, adding, “It could save your life.”

Overall, Armstrong wants to make sure that no one else has to experience what she and her family are now going through. “These 3 dimples have turned my world and my families world upside down,” Kylie writes. “We are shocked, we are numb, we are emotional, we are sometimes ok, we are pretending it’s not happening, we are trying to absorb information, we are dealing with tests, we are crying, we are trying to continue as normal. We are angry, we are sad. We have more questions than answers. We are doing our best to cope. The messages and phone calls to me, my husband and my children sometimes help and sometimes make us all cry.”

Amidst this heartbreaking message, Armstrong concludes, Please share to spread awareness.”

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