Teri Wilson
March 08, 2016 5:52 pm
Facebook

Thanks to a brave woman on Facebook, we can see exactly what the face of skin cancer looks like. And guys, it looks really painful.

Judy Noble Cloud, a 49-year-old mom and overall amazing human, spent a lot of time outdoors when she was younger (as many kids, teens and twenty-somethings did). She also used tanning beds, which (again) is not an uncommon activity. Unfortunately, as common as these things are, they also cause skin cancer. The Centers for Disease Control lists indoor tanning, childhood sunburns and exposure to the sun (either for work or play) all as risk factors for developing skin cancer later in life.

Of course, it’s easy not to think about these things while we’re working on our tans in the summertime. But Judy is encouraging us to think and be preventative. She recently posted a photo album to Facebook chronicling her skin cancer treatment. The photos are a sobering reminder of what’s at risk when we spend a day at the beach without sunscreen or hop into a tanning bed.

Her caption to the album reads in part, “This Is Skin Cancer. This is the result of using tanning beds when I was younger. This is the result of having numerous sunburns as a child and teen, and not being religious about applying sunscreen, and staying out in the sun far too long as a teen and into my 20’s and even early 30’s. On September 2, I had my fourth surgery to remove cancerous spots. The skin cancer keeps coming back…I hear too many people say that they feel better about how they look after they go to a tanning bed or after they bake in the sun for hours on end. Look at the pictures. This could be you. Anyone can get skin cancer, even people who have darker skin tones. It is a misconception that only fair-skinned people can get skin cancer. Skin cancer doesn’t discriminate.”

Here’s a photo of Judy before her skin cancer treatment:

And here’s a photo of Judy the day after her surgery:

This is 6 days post-op:

This photo shows Judy elevating her legs, wrapped in compression bandages, which she is something she had to endure for two straight weeks following skin cancer surgery on her legs:

According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, skin cancer is the most common type of cancer, and one in five Americans will develop it sometime during their lifetime. When found early, it usually can be cured via surgery. But certain types of skin cancer are deadly, and treatment isn’t a picnic, as Judy’s posts so clearly demonstrate.

Today, Judy is healing and doing great. Best of all, she’s been declared cancer free.

We wish Judy the best, and we salute her for shining a light on this important cause. Take care of yourselves, everyone! For a full list of skin cancer prevention guidelines, visit here.

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