Jessica Ellis
February 07, 2016 9:14 am
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Listen, guys, we know many people are Feeling the Bern right now, but there is a time and place for expressing political sentiment — and apparently Tinder is not it.

23 year-old Robin Gedrich of New Jersey discovered that this week when she was kicked off of the popular dating service for using it to spread the message of love for Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont.  “I used the same opening message to everyone,” the creative activist told local news station PIX11. “Do you feel the Bern and text WORK to a specific number.”

Texting the number, it turns out, would opt the texter in to receive updates from Bernie’s official campaign for the presidency. While this is an amusing form of political activism, it sounds like an awful way to get dates, but it turns out Robin was not alone. Haley Lent, a 22 year-old photographer in Iowa was also blocked from the app after a similar Bernie-favoring campaign. Speaking to Reuters, Lent explained, “I would ask them if they were going to vote in their upcoming primaries. If they said no or were on the fence, I would try to talk to them and persuade them to vote.”

Perhaps not surprisingly, Lent and Gedrich both belong to one of Bernie’s voter strongholds: Millennial women. Despite Hillary Clinton holding a strong lead with female Democrats overall, the recent Iowa caucus showed Senator Sanders absolutely trouncing the former Secretary of State with Millennials, including winning the support of 84% of all voters under 30, compared to Clinton’s 14%. Since Millennials tend to be a well-connected, social media savvy group, it’s perhaps not surprising that they’re taking to the the avenues of popular sites like Tinder to get out the vote.

And while it’s understandable that Tinder would want to keep political campaigning off their dating site, their swift response of banning both Lent and Gedrich is quite intriguing, given that the company is notoriously slow to act on other forms of harassment, like users sending unsolicited pornography. Come on, Tinder, do you really think that users wouldn’t prefer to see political activism than unwanted penis pictures?

We’re all for equal representation, however, so if Tinder should re-instate Lent and Gedrich’s accounts, we feel that other political candidates deserve equally snazzy campaign slogans. Here’s a few Tinder-appropriate ideas:

“Hey baby, are you planning to bump it with Trump-it?” “You’re so beautiful, you deserve an all-inclusive Cruz.” “Opt in to be showered with diamonds and Rubios.”

And of course:

“I don’t care that much about money, but I want a woman president so much you could call me a Hill-ionaire.”

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