Kit Steinkellner
February 09, 2015 11:18 am

Last November, we covered the outrage that surrounded Victoria’s Secret’s “Perfect Body” campaign. Customers, understandably, didn’t like being told that the only way to have a “perfect body” was to look like a Victoria’s Secret Angel.

Vicky heard our complaints and ended up changing their slogan to, “A Body For Every Body.” Which is a MUCH better motto for a lingerie company, though it doesn’t QUITE make sense. As good as the slogan sounds, it’s not the truth. Victoria’s Secret doesn’t manufacture for “every body.” As Business Insider reported last week:

“The largest panty size it offers is XL, or equivalent to a size 16. The fashion industry defines plus-size clothing as sizes 12 to 24, though many retailers offer up to a size 28 to meet demand.”

Business Insider also reports that bra sizes are “inconsistent,” with some styles offered in DDD while others are only offered in D.

So now customers are striking back and creating petitions that demand VS make good on their promise to offer pretty underthings for “every body.”

SoCal resident Dana Drew created the Change.Org petition: “Victoria’s Secret: Add Plus Sizes to Your Product Lines.” In her petition, Drew states:

“Victoria’s Secret should consider their bottom line when making this decision. There are over 100 million plus size women in the United States and we spent over 17.5 billion dollars on plus size clothing last year. Victoria’s Secret already offers larger bra sizes for women with enhanced and naturally bigger breasts; it makes perfect sense to expand their lines so women with larger bodies can also join the club.

. . . my point overall, let anyone, any size, walk in and pick something from the drawers.”

Drew already has over 1,000 supporters and has almost reached her goal.

Meanwhile, Brittany Cordt’s Change.Org petition “‘A Body For Every Body’ . . . Prove You Mean It, Victoria’s Secret!” makes the following tough, but fair point:

“The slogan change is hardly compelling shown in front of only extremely skinny models that represent less than 5% of women in the US. They are sending a message to the world that you have to be a size 0-2 to be beautiful and worthy of wearing lingerie. Victoria’s Secret is promoting self-loathing and it needs to stop.”

Cordt’s petition has over 2,000 signatures.

The hope is that by spreading the word, Victoria’s Secret will change their tune and actually start making undergarments for every body, plus-sized too.

Do you hear the people sing, Victoria’s Secret, singing the song of disenfranchised lingerie shoppers? You have a problem, and your customers are calling for change. Make good on your slogan, Vicky, and start manufacturing undergarments that really are “for every body.” Everybody is waiting.

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