Tab Brown / Getty Images
Olivia Harvey
October 25, 2016 12:13 pm

One of the most remarkable natural phenomenons you can encounter in life is witnessing a supermoon. The most recent was the Hunter’s Moon, which occurred on October 16th. But if you weren’t able to catch a glimpse, you have two more chances this year to see a supermoon in action.

You may be nodding your head at this point, pretending to understand what we’re telling you. And if so, you’re probably not alone. Although astrologer Richard Nolle coined the term 30 years ago, the term “supermoon” has only become mainstream knowledge fairly recently.

Nolle explained that a supermoon is a “new or full moon which occurs with the moon at or near (within 90% of) its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit.” In layman’s terms, it’s a full or new moon that makes you think that if you drive far enough, you can go touch it.

We highly recommend you watch the video below from NASA to absorb all you can about supermoons (or perigee full moons, as you’ll soon call them due to your vast supermoon knowledge).

Now that we know everything about why and how supermoons happen, when can we feast our eyes upon the next one? Very soon, readers. And this next supermoon is going to be the biggest one we’ve seen in the 21st Century thus far.

According to NASA, the November 14th full moon with be the closest supermoon to Earth of 2016. Even more impressive, a full moon won’t be that close again until November 25th, 2034. If you’re itching to feel like Elliott pedaling ET across the face of the moon, November 14th is absolutely the night to make that dream reality.

Universal Pictures / rebloggy.com

The last supermoon of 2016 will occur on December 14th, and although the moon will be a beautiful thing to behold, it will also hinder the appearance of the meteors from the usually jaw-dropping Geminid meteor shower. 

This shower produces about 100 visible meteors per hour, but due to the brightness of the moon, viewers will be lucky to see only around 12 per hour at the peak of the shower. Count your blessings that we still love you, Moon.

Mark your calendars and keep your eyes peeled, moon watchers. The upcoming two shows are not to be missed – with the size of these upcoming full moons, it’ll probably be hard to miss them anyway.

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