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Steph Barnes
December 14, 2017 10:25 am

It’s official: The FCC just voted to repeal Obama-era net neutrality protection policies. But this is not the end of the battle, and there are absolutely still ways you can fight the net neutrality repeal.

In case you haven’t been following the news, net neutrality essentially means that all internet content and access to that content is treated equally by internet service providers. Basically, your internet provider can’t charge you more to access certain sites.

In 2015, the FCC declared that “no one — whether government or corporate — should control free open access to the Internet.” However, the new ruling proposes to give more power to internet companies like Verizon, AT&T, and Comcast. These companies will theoretically be able to dictate the kind of content we’re able to access online and display content that is in the interest of their businesses.

The way we access the internet could quickly start looking like cable TV, with different packages available to access different parts for the web. For example, there could be a basic starter package with access to email and messenger services and websites chosen by your provider. Then a level up and more money could get you a premium package with access to social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. Another level up and additional costs, and you could be able to enjoy access to Netflix and Hulu.

While today’s ruling in favor of repeals is scary, it is not yet set in stone. The FCC will now face lawsuits almost immediately, and since courts tend to defer to government administrators, the issue could then make its way to Congress.

Here are a few ways you can still contribute to protecting net neutrality. The fight isn’t over.

Donate

There are many organizations currently fighting the good fight against repealing net neutrality protection, and you can help them by donating to the cause. Consider making a monetary donation or volunteering your time to orgs such as Free Press’ Save the Internet or the ACLU.

Reach out to your representatives.

If you’re unable to donate, you can still pick up the phone and call your representatives so that if this gets to Congress, they know where you stand on the issue. You can find out your representatives contact information here. And don’t forget — you can always tweet at most reps and/or message their Facebook pages, too. There are many ways to get your point across loud and clear.

Visit Battleforthenet.com

Battle for the Net makes it easy to sign petitions and get in touch with your reps on this issue. They’ll also keep you up-to-date on all the latest developments.

Let’s all do our part to protect the internet. This really, really matters.

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