Trilby Beresford
September 02, 2016 9:40 am
20th Century Fox

Despite the fact that it’s now extremely common for both men and women to hold full-time jobs outside of the home, the allocation of housework is still decidedly very uneven. In fact, according to Bloomberg, the balance of housework women do in the U.S. in comparison to men hasn’t actually changed all that much in 63 years. MAJOR UGH.

20th Century Fox / giphy.com

And a new study about gender convergence in housework tells us where in the world men are chipping in the most — and the least.

According to this graph, men in Norway and Australia contribute the most to their household chores (putting in about 72 minutes per day) with Italian and Israeli men contributing the least (at around 20 grand minutes).

And incase you’re wondering, while the U.S. came somewhere in the middle of all the countries surveyed, American women still do about an hour more housework per day than American men. Again, MAJOR UGH.

And yes, women do more in every country they studied.

FOX / giphy.com

While this technically isn’t all that surprising, the numbers don’t sting any less. Because it essentially means that women all over the world (even in the seemingly most progressive countries) carry an unequal burden of the workload. They’re expected to give it their all at the office while going home to a “second shift.”

Fellas, if you’re reading this, TAKE NOTE. And then do some dishes. Otherwise there just might be a mass-migration to Norway.

H/T Motto

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