Sarah Terry
May 09, 2017 2:55 pm

With healthcare in the spotlight, celebrities have been sharing their stories to show the importance of comprehensive healthcare. Jimmy Kimmel recently shared the harrowing story of his newborn’s heart surgery. And now, Sarah Michelle Gellar has opened up about her postpartum depression. The Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Cruel Intentions star joins many other celebs who have admitted to struggling with this condition after having a baby; Adele, Courteney Cox, Bryce Dallas Howard, Brooke Shields, and Drew Barrymore have all also spoken up about their postpartum depression. So many women feel alone in this, and it’s so important that they know they aren’t.

Sarah Michelle Gellar shared a powerful Instagram post about her postpartum depression as a way to continue the conversation about healthcare.

She captioned the post:

Wow, we are so glad she opened up. Sarah is the mom of two kids, Charlotte (7) and Rocky (4). And it’s clear these two have a pretty awesome mom.

That’s probably why Sarah wanted other mothers to know that even she struggled after giving birth. And she’s worried things might get worse. Under the new American Healthcare Act that recently passed in the House of Representatives, postpartum depression is considered a “pre-existing condition.” So the help that Sarah got might not be as available to mothers in the future. That’s why she recommends that we contact our representatives to demand they do better for mothers, and women in general, in this health insurance bill.

According to the Center for Disease Control, somewhere between 11% and 20% of women who give birth experience postpartum depression. It’s so treatable, but only 15% of women suffering from the condition receive treatment.

We’re grateful to women like Sarah for sharing their struggles with postpartum depression because their stories helps destigmatize it.

Mothers need to know that they aren’t worse mothers because they’re suffering. And we need to stick together and fight to keep postpartum depression and other very important mental health matters covered by insurance. Because our health is a total package, and we need to take care of all of it.

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