Gina Florio
December 08, 2016 5:38 pm

Imagine coming home from your daughter’s celebratory dinner with friends and family only to find a cruel letter in the mail from an anonymous bully. That was the reality for substitute teacher Kelley Markland a few weeks ago, when she pulled a letter out of the mailbox that fat-shamed her and criticized her fashion choices. The bully, who wasn’t even brave enough to reveal their identity, insisted she was too big to be wearing leggings in public.

The awful letter announced, “Women who weigh 300-pounds should not wear yoga pants!!”

As you can imagine, Kelley was shocked by such a horrendous display of hatred. She took to Facebook to boldly show what was in the letter.

There was a picture of a woman bending over, with a meme of Ron Burgundy’s judgmental face underneath that said, “Your pants say yoga but your ass says McDonalds.”

Kelley wrote a heartfelt response in her Facebook post, being completely honest about the fact that she was hurt by this, and that she just wants to know who would ever send something so gross and cruel.

Kelley pointed out that the way she dresses is not meant for anybody but herself, which means it’s nobody’s place to judge her for what she puts on in the morning.

“I have never pretended to be pretty or look good in clothing, I have never tried to be flashy or show off. Wearing my “fun” leggings gave me a tad bit of confidence in not looking sloppy all the time.”

She added, “Thank you for making me feel like absolute, complete shit. A wonderful night with my family had to end like this…..so unbelievably disappointed in people anymore.”

Since she shared the letter on Facebook, a lot of women have come forward to show support for her. They posted pictures of themselves wearing leggings, sent messages of encouragement, and some teachers at her school even wore leggings to work to stand in solidarity with her. The next day, she posted a video thanking all the people who showed their love.

The story went so viral that US Weekly interviewed Kelley about the incident. “I was blown away,” she told US Weekly when she realized how many people were on her side. “The letter killed me inside and I still get upset by it, but at the same time I have gained immense strength.”

Kelley is using this as a teaching tool for her 8-year-old and 10-year-old kids. She’s showing them that this kind of behavior should never be tolerated, but that unfortunately these bullies still do exist in this world. Fortunately, there are always good people who will be there to stand beside you and remind you that the way you look is nobody’s business but your own.

Advertisement