Anna Gragert
March 31, 2016 4:15 pm
Raindrop Cake

It all began a year ago, when Darren Wong first saw the Raindrop Cake — which is traditionally known as Mizu Shingen Mochi — being written about in Japan. Though not a chef, Wong, an advertising executive, saw an opportunity when a year later, he noticed that the Japanese dessert was still unavailable in the U.S. That’s when he aimed to make the treat himself, so he’d be able to try it along with others whose curiosity was piqued.

Raindrop Cake

Though the delicacy appears simple in form, its creation is complex.

Raindrop Cake

As for the dessert’s taste, Wong describes the Raindrop Cake as mild in taste, which can be amplified with toppings — such as brown sugar syrup and kinako soybean powder — to create a roasted, nutty flavor. It notably gives off a strong, sweet kick once it hits your taste buds.

As for the cake’s texture, that’s when your culinary experience gets interesting. “It’s very much about the delicate texture that melts in your mouth,” Wong tells us.

Raindrop Cake

Though the Raindrop Cake is not currently available across the U.S., lucky New Yorkers can give the dessert a try at Brooklyn’s Smorgasburg on April 2nd. Thankfully, Wong adds, “Other locations are a possibility we want to explore.”

All images reprinted with permission from the creative. Connect with Darren on his website or Instagram

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