Briana Hansen
April 17, 2016 12:43 pm
Warner Bros. Television

Coffee can sometimes get a bad reputation. While most people love it for the delectably bitter taste and added jolt of caffeine, there are many who argue that it is not good for your body. And for a long time, there has been a popular rumor that people with heart issues shouldn’t drink coffee (and avoid all extra caffeine in their diet).

But rest easy, coffee drinkers of the world! An article at MotherJones.com elaborates on a recent study that shows coffee might not after all be as bad for you as we’ve been told. The study was conducted by Dr. Greg Marcus of University of California-San Francisco. He and his team looked specifically into a connection between caffeine and heart problems.

Specifically, they looked to see if the introduction of caffeine would cause or exacerbate heart palpitations in coffee drinkers. In a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, Dr. Marcus argues that (at least in their study) they could find no link between caffeine consumption having any affect on these heart abnormalities.

Basically, coffee drinkers can rest assured that their morning cup of joe (though it can have other affects on your body) likely isn’t dramatically raising your risk of palpitations or dangerous heart problems. So go ahead and drink away.

United Artists/Giphy

Of course, always listen to your body and know that over-doing anything can be bad for you. Plus, keep in mind that Dr. Marcus is very clear that these are only preliminary results on a very specific question, so it’s still possible there are connections between caffeine and negative heart effects that just haven’t yet been proven. Be sure to check with your doctor before changing your caffeine intake if you’ve been given any specific instructions on it.

But, at least for now, coffee drinkers can sleep easy (assuming, of course, you don’t chug your coffee at night) knowing their daily flat white will likely not have negative long-term consequences on your heart’s health.

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