Karen Belz
August 26, 2016 2:50 pm
Sigalit Landau, in collab. with Yotam From, Marlborough Contemporary

Artists and art enthusiasts, there’s someone you need to pay some attention to: Sigalit Landau. Landau created a series of eight underwater prints, called it Salt Bride, and took the world by storm.

Landau worked with photographer Yotam From to create the collection, which is on display at Marlborough Contemporary until September 3rd. As for the dress itself, it features a traditional Hasidic style. Specifically, it’s a replica from the play The Dybbuk, which was written by S. Ansky in the early 1900s. The play is about a bride who finds herself possessed by a threatening spirit, and is exorcised. The dress, originally black, was soaked in the salty Dead Sea waters to morph it into a brand new form.

Interestingly enough, the Dead Sea isn’t a new place for Landau — in fact, she finds a lot of artistic inspiration there.

“Over the years, I learnt more and more about this low and strange place,” Landau said in a release. “Still the magic is there waiting for us: new experiments, ideas, and understandings. It is like meeting with a different time system, a different logic, another planet.”

The dress for this series was actually dipped in the Dead Sea waters for two months. Here are just a few of the photos that show the magic that took place.

The dress staying true to its original form.

Sigalit Landau, in collab. with Yotam From, Marlborough Contemporary

The magic of the Dead Sea starts taking control.

Sigalit Landau, in collab. with Yotam From, Marlborough Contemporary

In this image, you can really see the crystallization process taking over.

Sigalit Landau, in collab. with Yotam From, Marlborough Contemporary

The crystals are truly building, adding a completely new layer onto the dress.

Sigalit Landau, in collab. with Yotam From, Marlborough Contemporary

And here’s what two months of exposure to the Dead Sea will do. Gorgeous, isn’t it?

Sigalit Landau, in collab. with Yotam From, Marlborough Contemporary

Interestingly enough, this project is similar to The Dybbuk for one very key reason — the black dress turned into something slightly more bridal at the end. Hence, Salt Bride.

“Over time, the sea’s alchemy transforms the plain garment from a symbol associated with death and madness into the wedding dress it was always intended to be,” the press release states.

If you’re interested in seeing more of Landau’s interesting work, her website is filled with beautiful sculptures and projects she’s been working on for quite some time.

Advertisement