Alyssa Thorne
September 06, 2016 5:37 pm
Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic

Emily Ratajkowski – a 25-year-old actress and model perhaps best recognized for her part in the “Blurred Lines” music video – has been getting a lot of flack since temporarily stepping out of show business to stump for Bernie Sanders earlier this year, according to EW.

Instead of seeing her as bright and politically minded, people started calling her an “attention whore.”

In an open letter to Glamour, she talks about how she first ignored reactions to her interest in politics, but then realized just how openly sexist it was, and felt the need to speak up. The criticism started after Ratajkowski had the opportunity to speak at a Bernie Sanders rally in New Hampshire.

We hate this, because as Ratajkowski goes on to point out in her excellent letter, it’s only ever women who get criticized for being attention-seeking, though they’re simply pursuing their passions. Women are often trapped by this double-standard, and prevented from pursuing things that they’re interested in!

Not only that, but men don’t have to justify their interest in different subjects. But for some reason, women aren’t trusted to be honest when it comes to their own desires.

“I see it all the time, particularly when my girlfriends are getting ready to go out. They encounter this moment when they think, I don’t want to look like I tried too hard. They don’t want to be seen as desperate or vain . . . We view a man’s desire for attention as a natural instinct; with a woman, we label her a narcissist.”

We’re not sure we’d have the composure or eloquence to silence the haters so thoroughly, but we really applaud Emily Ratajkowski for her political involvement, for sticking to her convictions, and for calling out shitty sexist comments for what they are.

She closed her letter with a great sum of what the “ideal feminist world” looks like, and we want to close our story on that, too.

“The ideal feminist world shouldn’t be one where women suppress their human instincts for attention and desire. We shouldn’t be weighed down with the responsibility of explaining our every move. We shouldn’t have to apologize for wanting attention either. We don’t owe anyone an explanation. It’s not our responsibility to change the way we are seen—it’s society’s responsibility to change the way it sees us.”

We’re glad to have Ratajkowski getting involved with US politics (especially this year), and can’t wait to see what she does in the future.

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