"For anybody who is freaked out by a woman claiming her own space, shut the f*ck up."

Advertisement
Joshua Jackson and Jodie Turner-Smith
Credit: David M. Benett/Dave Benett, Getty Images

During a July visit to The Tonight Show, Joshua Jackson told host Jimmy Fallon that he knew he was destined to marry wife Jodie Turner-Smith "the moment she asked me." He then explained that Turner-Smith popped the question on New Year's Eve during a vacation to Nicaragua—"it was very beautiful, incredibly romantic." And he wouldn't have wanted it any other way, despite having the people of the internet on his behind.

Jackson provided further context to the proposal story in an August 17th Refinery29 interview after he said some people on the internet expressed they had a bone to pick with him about how the proposal went down—though, we're not sure why. It's 2021, people. Women can propose if they so choose.

"So I accidentally threw my wife under the bus because that story was told quickly and it didn't give the full context, and holy Jesus, the internet is racist and misogynist," Jackson told Refinery29. 

The Dr. Death star continued, "So yes, we were in Nicaragua on a beautiful moonlit night, it could not possibly have been more romantic. And yes, my wife did propose to me and yes, I did say yes, but what I didn't say in that interview was there was a caveat, which is that I'm still old school enough that I said, 'This is a yes, but you have to give me the opportunity [to do it too].'"

Jackson said he wanted to ask both Turner-Smith's biological father and her stepdad for her hand in marriage. He then told her, "'I would like the opportunity to re-propose those to you and do it the old fashioned way down on bended knee.' So, that's actually how the story ended up," Jackson said.

But, despite Jackson wanting to be a bit "old school," he added yet another disclaimer: "Also for anybody who is freaked out by a woman claiming her own space, shut the fuck up."

He said that sharing their proposal story has been "a real education for me as a white man" having to see the "ignorance and ugliness" of people who saw this as yet another reason they could tear Turner-Smith apart. "It is not okay. We have a long way to go."

Though we loved the original proposal story Jackson told, we must admit that this amendment makes it that much more sweet.