What To Read Now That You’ve Finished The Hunger Games Kate Spencer

You finished the entire Hunger Games trilogy in just 48 hours, existing only on Chinese take-out and your Peeta-loving tears. Congratulations! But now you’re stuck in a post-THG depression, craving more dark, dystopian young adult fiction. Maybe you’re even feeling a little embarrassed about this new desire. After all, you’re a high-functioning, stable and successful adult with great hair and a casual but cool wardrobe*. Is it normal to want to read about angst-y teens fighting oppressive future-governments while making out with each other? The answer is YES and I am here to drag you out of the darkness and into the arms of a whole new pile of thick books with giant fonts written for people half your age. Let’s read!

Divergent by Veronica Roth

The basic deets: In post-apocalyptic Chicago, society is divided into five factions based on very different and distinct virtues. 16-year-old Beatrice must decide to either stay with her family’s faction or follow her heart to another group and risk being shunned by her parents and peers.

Why you should read it: You’ll root hard for Beatrice, whose transformation from awkward to ass-kicker is nail-bitingly awesome. There is romance (which we are all suckers for, right?) but it’s still action packed and adrenaline filled.

What else:  Divergent, the first book in a yet unpublished trilogy, is the most Hunger Games-y of all the books listed here, so it’s a great “transition” read for those of you making the move into the YA world. The movie rights have been sold to Summit, the same peeps responsible for Twilight.(Kinda undecided on whether this a good or bad thing.) And if you want to really be inspired/depressed: Roth, 22, wrote the book during her senior year at Northwestern. But hey, I did laundry today so I’m equally as accomplished, right?

Delirium by Lauren Oliver

The basic deets: Lena lives within the confines of her society where, at eighteen, all teens are cured by the government of deliria (ie: love) and assigned a spouse and job. This all sounds good to Lena – whose own mother committed suicide after the cure failed her – until she falls in love three months before she’s scheduled to have the procedure.

Why you should read it: Do you want to have the chills, weep like a baby, feel like barfing and shudder from extreme joy all at once? Then this book is for you! The writing is impeccable and the emotional response you’ll feel as you root for Lena will destroy you from the inside out, leaving you whimpering in a bed of tear-soaked tissues. If you can’t tell, it’s my favorite on this list and is still haunting me months later. Sniff.

What else:  Fox 2000 has optioned the rights to the book, so if Hollywood likes it, it must be good! A sequel to Delirium is in the works, but while you wait for Oliver to crank that out you should check out her other best-selling YA novel, Before I Fall. It’s equally as enthralling as Delirium and focuses on a high school girl experiencing the last day of her life over and over again.

Matched by Ally Condie

The basic deets:  In Cassia’s world, society leaders decide what citizens do for work, what they eat and wear and whom they marry. Everything is going perfectly when Cassia is matched with her best friend, Xander (who is, duh, dreamy). But then a glitch in the system shows her with a different match, a mysterious boy named Ky (also dreamy!) and she must determine if she’ll let her government or her heart decide whom she loves.

Why you should read it: Matched is a solid future-world read, with a nice dose of romance to keep you swooning. Warning: there is a lot of unresolved sexual tension in this book and it takes characters forrrrrrever to even touch lips. You know, in case that matters to you. (It matters to me.)

What else: Matched is also the first book in a trilogy (with the second coming out this fall) and Disney has bought the film rights. See a trend?

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  1. I was going crazy for something to read after the Hunger Games, thanks for the suggestions!

  2. i cant wait to start reading the books you listed already bought the first two :) i am a 27yr old mom of two boys and i love reading! it helps me escape into a fantasy world and have dreams about it hehe! i have also read the vampire academy books which are amazing! and the house of night books are very good as well if you need some more to read :) thank you for your list!

  3. I have had the chance to read all of these they are great books I would like to also add pretties

  4. The Maze Runner trilogy is amazing too! I’m having to wait to get the final book and I am certain that it (along with being in nursing school) is slowly killing me but I can’t complain too much as I am a bit of a book fiend and have many many books (Goodwill is awesome people!) that I haven’t read yet so they will have to occupy my time for now.

  5. I listened to the first book of The Mortal Instruments series on CD and maybe the voice actress was just dull but it was extremely predictable and juvenile in the sense that the characters were static and fit the “fantasy novel” stereotype to a T. It might make a good movie however. Delirium appeals the most to me of this list.

    BUT if you REALLY want a good read to recover from the Hunger Games try The Underland Chronicles by Suzanne Collins (author of the Hunger Games). It’s amazing! Basic Deets: A boy and his baby sister fall out of his laundry chute into a secret underground world inhabited by humans, giant cockroaches, rats, and bats. A bit weird at first, I know, but just like HG I could not put it down. Think Alice in Wonderland meets Lord of the Rings meets A Wrinkle in Time. I finished over 300 pages in a record 5 hours and this series has 5 books!! (Headed to Barnes and Noble now ^_^). The only bad thing about these books is that, though they may cure you of your Hunger Games obsession, you’ll be entirely obsessed with these as well.

  6. Have you ever tried the Obernewtyn Chronicles by Isobelle Carmody? They’re excellent, The Hunger Games was actually originally just a read to get me through to the release of the final novel in the series this fall, but obviously these book are great so they don’t really become ‘just a book’ and suck you in, but the Obernewtyn Chronicles are fantastic.

  7. I havent read hunger games as of rite now im a little backed up on books I.pirchse while still reading a different one…but I can definitely recommend morganville vampire series its about 8 books out, you get two in one book which is an awesone ptice. I read thru them within a couple of nights…(i was glued to my computer, or carried book around) after the last twilight book which I wasnt a fan of I landed on these.short summary: claire a brilliant
    girl gets into a college in a small town in texas, were vampires run the town…its great has
    romance,action, betrayals…a book you really wont be able to put down.

  8. I havent read hunger games as of rite now im a little backed up on books I.pirchse while still reading a different one…but I can definitely recommend morganville vampire series its about 8 books out, you get two in one book which is an awesone ptice. I read thru them within a couple of nights…(i was glued to my computer, or carried book around) after the last teilight book which I wasnt a fan of I landed on these.short summary: claire a brilliant
    girl gets into a college in a small town in texas, were vampires run the town…its great has
    romance,action, betrayals…a book you really wont be able to put down.

  9. I’ve read Matched and Delirium and really liked them both. I started reading the first TMI and I couldn’t finish. Too much information, too many characters, too many plots… it got boring and very fanfic-y.

  10. Thank you, Thank you, Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  11. Battle Royale by Koushun Takami is also an awesome book publishing in 1999 and probably served as an inspiration for THG since there are so many similarities. I wish I could get into any of Cassie Claire’s, I mean Cassandra Clare’s books, but the taint of plagiarism left from her time as a fan fiction writer still lingers. And knowing that some of her original characters are meant to be Draco and Harry is still weird for me.

  12. This is such a great post. I’m reading exclusively YA dystopias this summer and my reading list includes all of your picks. I’d also recommend “Unlocked” by Cyndy d’Entremont, “Ashes ashes” by Jo Treggiari, “Wither” by Lauren DeStefano, and “Bumped” by Megan McCafferty.

  13. These are all such great suggestions! It’s going to take me years to get through them…which is fine with me.

    Kate Spencer | 8/05/2011 02:08 pm
  14. “existing only on Chinese take-out and your Peeta-loving tears” is a fantastic quote. Peeta is the greatest. Thanks for the suggestions. :)

  15. His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman. It came out before Harry Potter, and honestly — it’s WAY better and so severely underrated.

  16. I have certainly been reading THG in an endless loop. Looking forward to breaking the cycle with your suggestions! You should also check out the Tomorrow series by John Marsden. Not futuristic per se, but for some reason I draw parallels to THG. It’s more of a high-intensity invasion story that follows a group of teenagers when Australia is occupied by a foreign power. There are 7 books in the original series, and a sequel trilogy. The protagonist, Ellie, rivals Katniss as my favorite YA heroine; they definitely have similar spirit. And of course there is romance. Trust me, it’s worth the read. The first book has been made into a movie over in Australia, but not released here yet. Thanks again, love the article!

  17. I too suffered from withdrawal after reading the Hunger Games series so my resolution was to pass them on to everyone who was receptive so I could spread the joy and then re read them!

  18. Sorry, i couldn’t figure out how to respond without replying to previous post. That wasn’t exactly a “reply”. It wouldn’t let me connect.

  19. I cannot recommend the Uglies trilogy by Scott Westerfeld enough. (There’s four books, but you really only need to the first 3. The 4th is sort of a companion piece and not as good.) Set in a world where teens are given plastic surgery at the age of 16 to turn “pretty”. It’s actually what got me hooked on young adult fiction, especially dystopian.

    I’ve also been into Michael Grant’s Gone series, but it’s pretty f’ing depressing (4 books in and I’m still wondering if anything good is going to happen to these poor kids.) Still, awesome premise with lots of cool teens with powers.

    • Awesome recommendations!! I posted this link to my facebook page and twitter. And I added all books to my Goodreads “to read” list. Thank you. I LOVED the Hunger Games and read a couple other dystopia/YA books and loved them (Among the Hidden, The Giver), so needless to say, I’m addicted! Keep up the great work on hellowgiggles.com. It is my favorite blog to follow! :)

  20. in my desire to fill the void left after completing THG, I stumbled onto the the Outlander series. It is…. gasp… adult fiction, but well worth the extra reading effort that it requires. I just finished the first of the series at 1:45 this morning and about to order the next book, knowing the couple of days I will have to wait will allow me to get something other than reading done… one would hope.

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