— wedding bells

14 romantic literary passages that are perfect for wedding vows

20th Century Fox

When two people tie the knot, it’s a beautiful thing. When two word nerds tie the knot, it’s a whole different flavor of beautiful, especially if they decide to incorporate literary-inspired wedding readings into their ceremony.

There are so many great things about this — one of which is that you don’t have to write that part of the ceremony yourself! But on a more heartfelt note, there are countless beautiful words already crafted within the pages of stories old and new that put Hallmark cards to shame.

And as someone who used multiple literary passages in her own 2014 wedding ceremony (two of which, admittedly, are included in the following list!), this writer is all for letting your book-freak flag fly on what might be the most memorable day of your life. From Shakespeare to Seuss, the sky is the limit.

So if you’re a literature lover who’s getting married and scratching your head about meaningful content to use in your vows, keeping reading to explore some of our favorite romantic quotes and passages from classic and modern works alike.

1On finding your other half: Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë

“He’s more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same…my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger. I should not seem a part of it.”

2On becoming a better person: The Princess Bride, by William Goldman

“Do I love you? My God, if your love were a grain of sand, mine would be a universe of beaches…I have stayed these years in my hovel because of you. I have taught myself languages because of you. I have made my body strong because I thought you might be pleased by a strong body. I have lived my life with only the prayer that some sudden dawn you might glance in my direction. I have not known a moment in years when the sight of you did not send my heart careening against my rib cage. I have not known a night when your visage did not accompany me to sleep. There has not been a morning when you did not flutter behind my waking eyelids…”

“I love you. Okay? Want it louder? I love you. Spell it out, should I? I ell-oh-vee-ee why-oh-you. Want it backward? You love I.”

3On building an authentic foundation: Captain Corelli’s Mandolin, by Louis de Bernières

“Love is a temporary madness; it erupts like volcanoes and then subsides. And when it subsides, you have to make a decision: You have to work out whether your roots have so entwined together that it is inconceivable that you should ever part. Because this is what love is. Love is not breathlessness, it is not excitement. It is not the promulgation of promises of eternal passion. That is just being ‘in love,’ which any fool can do. Love itself is what is left over when being ‘in love’ has burned away, and this is both an art and a fortunate accident. Those who truly love have roots that grow toward each other underground, and when all the pretty blossoms have fallen from their branches, they find that they are one tree and not two.”

4On bottomless devotion: Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare

“My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
My love as deep; the more I give to thee,
The more I have, for both are infinite.”

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