— Science!

Neil deGrasse Tyson thinks "Guardians of the Galaxy" should be a silent movie for a very scientific reason

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There are no shortage of sci-fi movies coming out this summer. So who better than astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson to discuss the scientific accuracy of a few highly-anticipated big screen blockbusters?

The scientist has shared his thoughts on big sci-fi films before, even breaking down the science behind Star Wars on Twitter in 2015. So what does he think about the plot of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, which just hit theaters this week?

In a segment on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert, Neil deGrasse Tyson broke it down for us non-astrophysicists.

And he admitted that the Marvel blockbuster should actually be a silent film, at least during certain parts. Say what?!

He explained, “I think most sci-fi films that have stuff going on in space, they all have sound. But we’ve known from the very first movie in the Alien series that in space, no one can hear you scream. So if no one can hear you scream, no one can hear you explode either. So no, in Guardians of the Galaxy, it would be a silent movie for all the scenes in space.”

Of course, since part of Guardians of the Galaxy takes place in space, he wants that portion to be silent. But presumably you could still hear people on a spacecraft? Or on a separate planet? Right, Neil? Right!?

The scientist admits that he used to be troubled by the inaccuracy of these movies, joking, “I used to lose sleep over this, and then I realized if there’s enough other interesting things going on in a big-budget epic sci-fi film, then you can distract me from all the science you’re getting wrong. So a walking, talking tree, a raccoon that will insult you, a green woman…okay, do what you want. I’ll just sit back and watch.”

We’re glad to hear his input. And it’s good to know that at least a compelling storyline and fun characters can make him suspend his disbelief. Since, after all, these movies are just meant to be entertaining and not, you know, factually accurate.

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