Books Made of Paper Jennifer Egan: ‘A Visit from the Goon Squad’ Lindsey Silken

It’s superfluous to say that Jennifer Egan’s newest book, A Visit from the Goon Squad is a great read. It won a Pulitzer, so that pretty much goes without say.

I think sometimes, the books that get raised to award-winner status are the ones that leave you not with a certain idea or revelation, but a deep exhalation and feeling of “whoa”.  A book that is not only popular but praised is a book that explores and digs.

This book, which takes on a different point of view (of various, linked characters) in each chapter, seems to dig through time, through characters, into music, culture and the ultimate question: Where are we humans going in life?

Jennifer Egan

Yeah, that’s kind of way heavy. But Egan so fully absorbed me in the characters and the story that I willingly went digging with her into the lives of her characters. I kind of wished I knew more about music while I was reading, since that’s a connecting thread for her characters, but it was written in an approachable way.

In fact, writing about something you’re an expert on is a great way to teach your readers something, and make yourself, the writer, seem like you know your stuff. Have any of you written a work of fiction that utilizes a topic you’re an expert on or researched ‘til your mind was numb?

I’m writing a story right now in which I decided a child needed to die. Sad, but necessary. I probably won’t end up using very much of the back story in the actual story, but I found that in order to understand the psyche of the parents, I needed to concoct (if only in my own head) a believable medical history for the kid.

Luckily, my father is a doctor and a story teller. And once he started telling me some true-life accounts, I found my own story taking on a life of its own.

Have you read A Visit from the Goon Squad? Is there another book by Jennifer Egan you recommend? And what’s been your experience with researched fiction?

Image via JenniferEgan.com by Pieter M. Van Hattem/Vistalux.

Top image from Barnes & Noble.

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  1. I agree that it was sometimes hard to jump from one character to another. She does a great job of getting you invested in each section, only to then switch to another, which doesn’t work for everyone. And I think she was going for a very music-inspired style which does not follow chronological time. This may or may not have worked for some readers.

  2. I tried to read this book, but couldn’t get past chapter 3. It’s extremely, EXTREMELY well written but it’s also pretty depressing. I didn’t like any of the characters or want to get to know them; Egan’s writing is beautiful, it was just a matter of personal taste.

  3. why did I hate this book so much!! I wish I could have enjoyed it!!

  4. I literally JUST started reading this book on a plane Thursday night. I read Look At Me a few months ago and thought that the writing could be better but the concepts it put forth were great. The writing in A Visit From the Good Squad hooked me right away and I can tell it’s going to be great!

  5. Good idea to draw a map! And thanks for the other recs, Emily. Glad you ladies liked the book, too!

  6. I too love this book. Simply brilliant. But I also recommend all of her books–specifically Look At Me and The Keep. I just love Jennifer Egan’s writing style.

  7. This is the best book I’ve ever read. I loved how it was totally non-linear, yet you could really follow the entire story, and remember all the strings that linked every one of them together. I thought it was a brilliant book.

  8. just finished reading that book today! had to draw a map linking the different characters together :) great book full of so many different plots