From Our ReadersHow To Increase Your Attention Span (Or At Least Stop Refreshing Facebook Every Five Minutes)From Our Readers

You guys, the internet is breaking my brain.

Several weeks ago I decided to join the world of Serious Bloggers and put together a newsletter/email list (don’t worry, it’s probably the least annoying email newsletter you’ll ever receive.) In order to put together said newsletter, I had to watch a ten minute instructional video on MailChimp.

And after about three minutes of watching this video? I had completely lost interest.

I could not handle watching a well-edited, informative, funny video that would teach something I needed to know. Because that video required me to really pay attention to something for more than three minutes.

Twitter/Facebook/Google, I blame you. Also, I blame myself. I don’t want to be the person who can’t sit still for more than ten minutes and won’t read things without bullet points! I don’t want my instant reaction to a tough bit of code, an unpleasant email or some uneditable writing to be “Ugh. Has anything popped up in Google reader? I’m going to see if anyone has responded to my latest hilarious Facebook update!” Puke.

So! Let’s talk about ways to increase our attention spans! And let’s bold those ideas so we can skim them as quickly as possible and then get back to our Facebook refreshing.

Meditate
Most hippie-dippie things make me roll my eyes and groan. I’m deeply pragmatic and if you try to talk to me about your chakras I’ll get all uncomfortable and slowly back away. With that said, meditation has been scientifically proven to make you calmer, more focused and less likely to be depressed. And you don’t need to view it as a spiritual practice. Simply set the timer on your phone for five minutes, sit with you back against the wall, close your eyes and actively empty your mind. Ommmm-chanting and incense-burning not required!

Do a bit of physical activity
We’ve all heard it a million times – physical activity makes you happier, calmer, more focused and generally more awesome. You don’t have to join a gym or do a Jillian Michael’s caliber workout to see the effects. Just a ten minute walk through the park, a bit of stretching a few rounds of sun salutations or even just a dance break can do wonders. Sometimes when I’m feeling listless, sleepy or unfocused, I’ll pull up the She Wolf video, put it on repeat and dance around the kitchen for ten minutes. I am not kidding at all.

Set a timer
Have you heard of the Pomodoro technique? It will change your life. The crux is this: set a timer for 25 minutes and then do one thing for those 25 minutes. When the timer dings, you get a five minute break to do whatever you want, then you set the timer again and keep going. And no multitasking! Here’s another variation on this technique that uses boredom as a motivator.

Do five more
Your attention span is like a muscle – the more you exercise it, the better it gets. So if you hit a wall (like losing interest in a useful instructional video) force yourself to do five more. Read for five more minutes, do five more problems, write five more sentences. You might catch a second wind and if you don’t? At least, you’ve been slightly more productive and you’ve stretched your attention span muscle.

Limit your screen time
In my fantasy life – in which my self control is about triple what it is now – I stop watching TV or using my computer after 7 pm. I’d love to spend my evenings hanging with friends, making dinner, reading, going out or creating things with my hands rather than my computer. I bet we could all be better about this, eh?

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  1. Interestingly enough, most of these techniques are also recommended to help with ADD/ADHD. I know I use “meditation”, the “five more”, and (when really necessary) coffee to help manage my symptoms. I still can’t sit still and do one thing for more than five minutes, but I used to be worse.

    Another technique that I love and that has actually made a huge difference (and often makes me get more done than my friends) is multi-tasking. OK, so I can’t do one thing for more than a few minutes. I line up two or three tasks that I need to do and I alternate between them. I can write 3000 words in one day, but it will probably be 1000 each on a different essay or story. I wrote almost the entirety of one year’s NaNo novel (53,000 words) while watching videos for a Psychology class and I ended up doing really well in that class. If you really can’t focus, harness that and give yourself multiple important things to focus/work on. For me, it means that even my “down time” watching TV can actually be productive time.

  2. Great post, also it introduced me to cute roulette. I’m in Wellington! and it threw me for a second seeing my hometown mentioned in a Hello Giggles post :)

  3. I loved this post. Very helpful tips :)

  4. Haha I lose interest in everything after about 5 mins, which is really not helpful at all, so I’ve decided to take up the 21 day Opera Meditation Challenge! Let’s see how long that lasts!!

  5. The Pomodoro technique is what divine genius looks like.

  6. I needed this. Mine manifests in so many ways, tumblr has made it sooooo much worse. But also, I have developed a fast forwarding problem even with shows I actually really like.

  7. Thank you for this!! (praise hands emoji)
    going to help me through the first semester of uni :)